.

Landscape character assessment

Explains what landscape character assessment is, are more detailed assessments available and consultation that took place. 

What is a Landscape Character Assessment?

A Landscape Character Assessment identifies the areas of distinct landscape character within the East Riding and makes judgments about the quality, value, sensitivity and capacity for new development in each landscape character area identified.

The Assessment has been prepared to inform the preparation of the Local Development Framework and will be used to guide and inform policy development, consider landscape protection policies, including local landscape designations and to guide future land allocations. It will also be used by the council to help determine planning applications, including those for renewable energy.

The Landscape Character Assessment was published in November 2005.

Sections 1 to 3

Introduction, landscape context and overview (pdf 946kb opens in new window)

Section 4 - Landscape character types

Map of Landscape Character Types (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

TitleModified
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011
Icon
Unrestricted
06/09/2011

Sections 5 to 7 and Appendices 

Summary, references, glossary and appendices (pdf 705kb opens in new window)

Detailed assessments (2013 Updates)

In 2005, we also prepared a more detailed analysis of the landscape and townscape surrounding the settlements identified in the East Riding Local Plan.  The assessments described the landscape around the edge of the settlements and make judgments about landscape quality, capacity and sensitivity. The purpose of the assessment is to provide a strategic assessment of the landscape to inform the allocation of development (residential, employment & retail) around settlements in the emerging Local Plan. The updated assessments prepared in 2013 have considered changes to the landscape since 2005 taking into account recently constructed development, along with changes to assessment methodology since the previous  study was completed. 

Introduction (pdf 267kb opens in new window)

Major Haltemprice Settlements (pdf 3mb opens in new window)

Beverley (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Bridlington (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Goole  (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Driffield  (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Elloughton cum Brough  (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Hedon  (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Hornsea (pdf 721kb opens in new window)

Howden  (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Market Weighton (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Pocklington (pdf 1mb opens in new window)

Withernsea (pdf 704kb opens in new window)

Appendices (pdf 560kb opens in new window)

Has the council identified Important Landscape Areas?

Yes. Through the East Riding Local Plan preparation process, the council has identified six Important Landscape Areas: 

  • The Yorkshire Wolds
  • Heritage Coast at Flamborough
  • Heritage Coast Spurn
  • River Derwent Corridor
  • Lower Derwent Valley and Pocklington Canal
  • Thorne, Crowle and Goole Moors. 

The extent of the Important Landscape Areas is set out on the emerging East Riding Policies Map. The document below sets out how the council's consultants reviewed the boundaries of the Important Landscape Areas in preparation for the Proposed Submission Strategy Document.

Important Landscape Areas boundary review 2014 (pdf 5mb opens in new window)

Did any consultation take place on the Landscape Character Assessment?

During the production of the Assessment, comments were sent from a wide range of organisations and individuals. An initial consultation exercise was held in March 2005 with a number of statutory consultees, where the following questions were discussed:

  • What are the important characteristics of the East Riding landscape?
  • What are the main detractors which exist?
  • What are the main issues and pressures affecting the landscape character?
  • What would be your ideal for the East Riding landscape in 10–20 years time?

Minutes March 2005 (pdf 36kb opens in new window)

A second consultation event was held in July 2005 to obtain feedback on the draft character areas and types.

Minutes July 2005 (pdf 33kb opens in new window)

A schedule of responses to the various consultation exercises is available:

Schedule of responses (pdf 114kb opens in new window)

Last Updated: Tuesday, 24 January 2017