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What is neighbourhood planning?

 

What is neighbourhood planning?

Neighbourhood planning is a key part of the Government’s Localism agenda. It aims to give local communities greater power to shape development by taking a more active role in the development of planning policies at a local level. Within the East Riding, neighbourhood planning will be led by town and parish councils, with East Riding of Yorkshire Council providing technical assistance and making necessary decisions at key stages.

Neighbourhood planning can be used for a variety of purposes.  For example it can be used to:

  • identify where new homes, shops and industrial uses should be built,
  • have a say on what new buildings look like,
  • grant planning permission for new development that a community want.

Town and parish councils have greater influence over new development in their local area by preparing neighbourhood plans and orders.

Neighbourhood plan

With a neighbourhood plan communities can create a vision and planning policies for the use and development of land in a neighbourhood. For example, where new homes should be built and what they should look like. Neighbourhood plans can be general or more detailed, depending on what local people want.  They must be however, be in general conformity with the strategic policies in the council’s adopted Local Plan and should not be used to promote a lower level of development than is set out in the Local Plan.

Neighbourhood order

With a neighbourhood order communities can grant planning permission for development they want to see go ahead in a neighbourhood. For example, allowing certain developments, such as extensions to houses, to be built without the need to apply for planning permission.

Community Right to Build Order

A Community Right to Build Order is a type of neighbourhood order which gives community organisations the power to deliver development the local community want without the need to apply for planning permission. For example, communities may wish to build new affordable homes or new community amenities. Receipts from development stay within the community and are used for community benefit, for example to provide and maintain local facilities such as village halls.

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How are neighbourhood plans and orders prepared?

Neighbourhood plans and orders are prepared through a formal process before they can be adopted by East Riding of Yorkshire Council. This includes designating the ‘neighbourhood area’ that will be covered by the plan or order, public consultation and an assessment by an independent examiner. They must also be agreed at a local referendum before they can be adopted.

Detailed arrangements for neighbourhood planning are set out in the Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012 (and subsequent amendments).

A summary of the key steps involved in the preparation of neighbourhood plans and orders is available to view below:

Neighbourhood planning process diagram (pdf 335kb opens in new window)


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What progress has been made with neighbourhood plans?

The file below sets out the latest position with the progress on the various neighbourhood plans in the East Riding.

Neighbourhood plans - progress note (pdf 89kb opens in new window)

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What is a neighbourhood plan area application?

Designation of a neighbourhood area is the first stage in the preparation of a neighbourhood plan.  The relevant town or parish council looking to prepare a neighbourhood plan submits an application to East Riding of Yorkshire Council requesting their area be designated a neighbourhood area for the purposes of preparing a neighbourhood plan. This application is called an area application.

Only one neighbourhood plan can be adopted for each neighbourhood area although it is possible for more than one town or parish council to come together to form a single neighbourhood area. In most cases it is expected that a neighbourhood area will follow existing town or parish boundaries.

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How can I submit an Area Application?

Area applications include a map identifying the proposed neighbourhood area and information on why the area is considered appropriate for the purposes of preparing a neighbourhood plan.

The easiest way to submit an area application is to complete the application form available below and send it to:

Forward Planning
Room FS32
East Riding of Yorkshire Council
County Hall
Beverley
HU17 9BA

Email: forward.planning@eastriding.gov.uk

Area Application Form (doc 33kb opens in new window)

Please contact Forward Planning for help completing this form.


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Has the council designated any neighbourhood areas?

Yes. The council has approved all area applications listed below, in accordance with the Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012 (and subsequent amendments).

Barmby Moor area application consultation

Barmby Moor Parish Council has submitted an application for part of its parish to be designated as a neighbourhood area. The area constitutes the majority of the parish with the exception of the Pocklington Industrial Estate as this is already designated within Pocklington's neighbourhood area. Neighbourhood areas cannot overlap.

We welcome your comments on the area application and have provided a response form below to make your views known. The consultation period began on Monday 1 February and will end on Monday, 14 March 2016.

Barmby Moor neighbourhood area application (pdf 4.5mb opens in new window)

Barmby Moor area application response form (word 82kb opens in new window)

All comments should be submitted to:

Forward Planning
East Riding of Yorkshire Council
County Hall
Cross Street
Beverley
East Riding
HU17 9BA

Email: forward.planning@eastriding.gov.uk


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Will my area be covered by neighbourhood planning?

Neighbourhood planning is an optional tier of planning. Town and parish councils do not have to create a neighbourhood plan or order. If a town or parish council chooses not to produce a neighbourhood plan or order, planning applications submitted to East Riding of Yorkshire Council will still have to conform to the existing development plan.

You may wish to contact your town or parish council to find out if they are seeking to prepare a neighbourhood development plan or order.

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What is the difference between a neighbourhood plan and a parish plan?

Neighbourhood planning is not entirely new. Some communities are already involved in planning for their area through community led parish plans. Community led parish plans cover all things important to a community and are not directly linked to the planning system, neighbourhood plans relate to the use and development of land.

Community-led parish plans remain valid tools for parish councils to use and provide a more informal basis on which to undertake neighbourhood planning. East Riding has 168 parish councils of which over 50 have been involved in the community led parish planning process.

More information about community led parish planning can be found on our community led parish planning page.

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How does neighbourhood planning link with other planning policy?

Neighbourhood plans are the first plans developed at a parish council level with legal force. They are formal statutory documents and are additional to, not a replacement for, the emerging East Riding Local Plan.

If a neighbourhood plan is adopted after following the formal process set out above, it will be used by East Riding of Yorkshire Council to make decisions on planning applications.

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What funding is available to Town and Parish Councils for Neighbourhood Planning?

Town and parish councils lead and resource the preparation of a neighbourhood plan or order and the associated public consultation. External funding and support is available to do this, in addition to the support and advice offered by East Riding of Yorkshire Council.

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has committed to making £22.5 million between 2015 and 2018 to provide community groups with expert advice, grant funding and technical assistance for neighbourhood planning. The programme is being delivered by Locality, a national network of community-led organisations, on behalf of DCLG.

Town and parish councils demonstrating a need for grant support will be eligible to apply for up to £8,000. This money could cover developing a website, training sessions for members of the steering group, help with putting together a project plan, undertaking a household survey, help with developing the evidence base, engaging a planning expert and venue hire, publicity materials, printing and other costs associated with consultation. More complex neighbourhood plans and orders may be eligible for technical support in addition to the grant support.

The programme commenced in April 2015. Town and parish councils can complete an expression of interest form to establish what type of support they are eligible for. Further guidance and the expression of interest form are available to view here:

My Community website (external website)



Community Right to Build

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has established the community buildings project support grants scheme to help eligible community groups progress a community right to build order. The programme is being delivered by Locality, a national network of community-led organisations, on behalf of DCLG.

Town or parish councils can apply for revenue grants of between £5,000 and £40,000. Applicants must be able to provide a contribution of at least 10% of the estimated costs of developing the proposal.

The money could cover engaging an architect and/or other professionals such as surveyors to carry out works needed to produce detailed plans, legal, financial or other professional input to the project, technical studies and any costs associated with public engagement and consulting on the project.


Other Sources of funding

Awards for All provides small lottery grants of between £300 and £10,000. They fund a wide range of community projects and have previously provided funds for  town and parish councils in the East Riding.

Further information on the eligibility criteria and how to apply for this funding is available here:

Big Lottery Fund website (external website)

Town and parish councils may also wish to contact the funding team at East Riding of Yorkshire Council for support on grants and funding within the community sector.

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Where can I find more information about neighbourhood planning?

The council has prepared a series of topic notes providing further guidance on neighbourhood planning. The topic notes and a summary of each note are available to view below:

1. Introduction to Neighbourhood Planning

Explains what neighbourhood plans and orders are and provides information on the different types of plans and orders, the role of town and parish councils in neighbourhood planning and examples of neighbourhood plans in the East Riding.

Note 1 - Introduction to Neighbourhood Planning (pdf 231kb opens in new window)

2. Neighbourhood Planning and the East Riding Local Plan

Provides further information on the East Riding Local Plan and explains the relationship between neighbourhood planning and the Local Plan.

Note 2 - Neighbourhood Planning and the East Riding Local Plan (pdf 176kb opens in new window)

3. Step by Step Guide to preparing Neighbourhood Plans and Orders

Explains in detail the process for preparing a neighbourhood plan or order. The role of East Riding of Yorkshire Council and town and parish councils is explained.

Note 3 - Step by Step Guide to preparing Neighbourhood Plans and Order (pdf 1.06mb opens in new window)

4. Undertaking Environmental Assessments

Considers environmental assessments and when they are required. Explains the process for requesting a Screening Opinion from East Riding of Yorkshire Council.

Note 4 - Undertaking Environmental Assessments (pdf 552kb opens in new window)

5. Guide to community consultation and engagement

Considers community consultation for neighbourhood plans and orders. Provides advice and best practice on how to involve the community in the preparation of plans and orders.

Note 5 - Guide to community consultation and engagement  (pdf 9.21mb opens in new window)

6. Support and funding for Town and Parish Councils

Explains the support offered by East Riding of Yorkshire Council to town and parish councils and provides up to date information on sources of funding.

Note 6 - Support and funding for Town and Parish Councils (pdf 180kb opens in new window)

7. Further information

Includes sources of further information on neighbourhood planning.

Note 7 - Further Information (pdf 187kb opens in new window)


The following links also provide useful sources of information:

Department for Communities and Local Government: Neighbourhood Planning (external website)

The Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012 (external website)

Planning Aid - briefing notes and guides (external website) 

Neighbourhood Planner - interactive map tool (external website)

Neighbourhood Planning - Planning Aid (external website)

If you would like more information on neighbourhood planning, or would like to discuss neighbourhood planning in your area, contact the Forward Planning team at forward.planning@eastriding.gov.uk or call (01482) 391738.


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Where can I find more information about the Localism Act?

Neighbourhood planning has been enabled though the Localism Act 2011. A Briefing Note provided to town and parish councils on the planning implications of the Localism Act is available to view below.

Briefing note for town and parish council on the Localism Act 2011 (pdf 168kb opens in new window)

The following link is another useful source of information:

Department for Communities and Local Government: A plain English guide to the Localism Act 2011 (external website)

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