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Education Inclusion Service

My child has additional needs. What help is available to me?

The LOOK AHEAD service in the East Riding of Yorkshire is for parent carers of disabled children, arising out of a disability or health condition.

This service is provided through FISH (Families Information Service Hub).

Find out what LOOK AHEAD can do for you and your child here 
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Can I get help because my child has special educational needs (SEN)?

Yes, you can get help if your child has special educational needs.

Children have special educational needs if they have a learning difficulty.  A learning difficulty means that a child finds it harder to learn than most children of the same age, or a child has a disability which makes it difficult for them to use the usual facilities in local schools. Some children have learning difficulties from a very early age and others may develop learning difficulties at some time in their school life.

Children with learning difficulties will need some additional help if there are worries about the progress they are making.  If this is the case then the school will make some additional or different action to help the child learn more effectively.

If you are concerned about that your child may have difficulties with learning then you should talk to someone as soon as possible, as parents are often the first to notice.

You should speak to your child's teacher or the special needs coordinator (SenCo) in your child's school.

If your child has not yet started school you could speak to your GP, health visitor or childcare setting.

The SEN process is contained in the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2001).  A copy of this Code alongside SEN - A guide for parents and carers (2009) can be obtained free of charge by visiting the DfE website.

Department for Education DfE (external website)

Further information about special educational needs can be found in the following pdf documents.

 

Children's special educational needs review booklet (pdf 203kb opens in a new window)

Children's special educational needs statement booklet (pdf 182kb opens in a new window)

Children's special educational needs assessment booklet (pdf 213kb opens in a new window)

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Can I get help for my child who has behaviour difficulties in school?

Yes you can get help if your child has behavioural difficulties, or social/emotional difficulties. 

Children who show behavioural problems may have special educational needs. Some children have behavioural problems from a very early age and others may develop difficulties at some time in their school life.  

Children with behavioural difficulties may need some additional help if there are worries about the progress they are making. If this is the case, then the school will take some additional or different action to help the child learn more effectively, and to settle their behaviour. 

Most schools have a named advisory teacher for behaviour. Schools highlight children they want advisory teachers to work with via regular school visits. If the school thinks your child would benefit from the support of an advisory teacher, you will be asked to give your written permission for an advisory teacher to become involved with your son or daughter. 

If you are concerned about your child's progress in learning or behaviour then you should speak to your child's teacher or the special needs coordinator in the school. If your child has not yet started school you could speak to your GP, health visitor, the pre-school or nursery.

Further information about special educational needs can be found in the following pdf documents.


Children's special educational needs review booklet (pdf 203kb opens in a new window)

Children's special educational needs statement booklet (pdf 182kb opens in a new window)

Children's special educational needs assessment booklet (pdf 213kb opens in a new window)

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Can I get help because my child is being excluded from school?

Yes you can get help if your child has been excluded from school, either permanently or for a fixed number of days.

Children and young people who have behavioural problems sometimes get excluded from school for a number of days (fixed term exclusion) or permanently (permanent exclusion).

When this happens, it can be a stressful time for the pupil and their parents/carers. The local authority exclusion and reintegration officers will support parents/carers and their children through this difficult period, and will help to sort out the next steps. 

If your child has been excluded, or you are worried that he/she is about to be excluded, you should speak to staff from school and/or contact a exclusion and reintegration officer on (01482) 392254.

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What is the Education Inclusion Service?

The educational Inclusion Service is mainly concerned with children and young people (aged 0-19 years) who may have significant difficulties with their education. The Education Inclusion Service works with schools and early years providers to offer advice and support relating to the psychological, social, emotional, behavioural, physical, communication or other difficulties.

The service also works with local authority officers and other organisations to help improve provision for children with special educational needs.  The service aims to develop better ways of supporting the educational, social and emotional development of all children and young people in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

The educational psychology and behaviour support team is part of the inclusion team in the children, family and adult services directorate (CFAS) in the East Riding Yorkshire Council.

It consists of a team of educational psychologists, advisory teachers, a parent support worker , local authority alternative placement officers, exclusion and reintegration officers, and two pupil referral units (PRUs).

All educational psychologists are specialists in the psychological development, behaviour and learning of children and young people. Educational psychologists are very familiar with the work of schools and the education system. They all have a degree in psychology (or equivalent qualification) plus a specialist, masters or doctorate qualification in educational psychology.

All the advisory teachers are experienced teachers. Most have additional teaching qualifications that enable them to offer expert advice on social, emotional and behaviour difficulties. All other staff have appropriate qualifications and experience to undertake their specific role.

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What are the aims of the Educational Inclusion Service?

The aims of the Educational Inclusion Service are:

  • to support schools and parents/carers in ensuring that all children, but more specifically children with special educational needs have the greatest access possible to the school curriculum
  • to give advice to teachers, parents/carers and others on the social, emotional and learning needs of their children
  • to provide a training and consultancy service to schools and other organisations concerned with children's needs
  • to give psychological advice to the local educational authority, sometimes as part of statutory assessments of children's needs
  • to support key stage four pupils in accessing and attending appropriate work related learning packages as needed
  • to support children and their carers through the permanent exclusion system and to also help place excluded pupils in appropriate education.

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What sort of help does the service provide?

The team provides all kinds of help for the children. This help includes:

  • assisting schools and settings with aspects of a child’s development that are causing concern, for example, physical, learning, visual, hearing, communication, social, emotional and behavioural difficulties
  • assisting schools in identifying and addressing problems associated with disaffection and their effects on behaviour
  • promoting the development of a multi-staged approach to behaviour management within the various management teams within schools
  • providing specific advice and support to schools in relation to particular pupils or groups of pupils causing concerns with regard to behaviour
  • helping with the placement of pupils by working in close cooperation with schools, parents and pupils to increase the likelihood of success
  • working in close cooperation with schools in the preparation of individual behaviour plans (IBP) and pastoral support plans (PSP). This includes developing ways to use all appropriate resources and personnel within, and outside school
  • developing effective liaison with all agencies involved in the management and care of these pupils including those 'looked after'
  • using a range of assessment strategies and develop shared criteria for referral to associated agencies
  • assisting schools in their management of behaviour in order to improve the educational experiences of children with behavioural difficulties and to reduce the number of exclusions across the authority
  • providing effective programmes for the reintegration of excluded pupils
  • encouraging the adoption of a multi-disciplinary approach for all pupils experiencing/causing behavioural difficulties
  • maximising access to education for excluded pupils in key stage 4
  • and providing advice and support at the stage of pupils transferring between infants and junior, and primary/junior to secondary school.

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How do children come to the attention of the educational inclusion Service?

The educational Inclusion Service become aware of pre-school children through health professionals including paediatricians and speech therapists or specialist pre-school teachers known as portage home workers.

Schools will make the team aware of school-age children.

Each school has a named educational psychologist and advisory teacher.

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How can I see an educational psychologist for my child?

Educational Psychologists support children who may have significant difficulties with their education relating to psychological, social, emotional, behavioural, physical, communication or other difficulties.

Educational psychologists work jointly with parents and professionals using their knowledge of psychology, education, child development and special educational needs (SEN). Educational Psychologists all have professional qualifications in psychology and educational psychology.

Educational Psychologists work as part of the Educational Inclusion Service, which is in the Children, Family and Adult Services Directorate (CFAS) in the East Riding Of Yorkshire Council.

Each school has a named Educational Psychologist.  Schools highlight children they want Educational Psychologists to work with via regular school visits. You will be asked to give your written permission for an Educational Psychologist to become involved with your son or daughter.

If you are concerned about your child’s progress then you should speak to your child’s teacher or the special needs coordinator in the school. If your child has not yet started school you could speak to your GP, health visitor, the pre school or nursery.

Educational Psychologists are approached by teachers because of many different problems and questions. Educational Psychologists may not always be the right service to help, but if not, generally can suggest who can be contacted for advice.

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What happens if my child is referred to an educational psychologist?

An educational psychologist will attend a consultation meeting in your child's school. You will usually be invited to attend this meeting. Other people may, with your approval be asked to join this consultation.

The first meeting will aim to clarify what the concern is. Information will be collected from teachers, yourself and the educational psychologist may observe your child in class. If the educational psychologist feels they need further information they may see your child on an individual basis.

Based on all the information collected strategies will be agreed and then implemented by school. Sometimes parents will also be asked to carry out a programme at home. A review date will be set at the end of the meeting to ensure that your child's progress is monitored and that the strategies can be modified depending on the outcome of the review.

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What if I do not want the help of an educational psychologist?

If someone contacts the Educational Inclusion Service,  about your child they should have had your agreement beforehand. If you did agree but later change your mind then the involvement of the service will stop at your request.

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Will I be able to see what has been written about my child?

Yes.

Everything the educational psychologist and advisory teacher does and writes concerning your child is available for you to see. You will receive a copy of all consultation records about your child, directly from the educational Inclusion Service.

 

Parent Partnership Service Confidentiality Policy (pdf 71kb opens in a new window)

Parent Partnership Service Impartiality Policy (pdf 81kb opens in a new window)


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What kind of help will be given?

In consultation with parents and other adults who may be involved (teacher or health visitor for example) the educational psychologist will jointly decide on an appropriate course of action. This action will usually involve school and parents implementing some sort of intervention programme.

The programme can be for learning or social emotional development. A programme may involve more than one aspect of development. Sometimes it may be appropriate to make a referral to another agency which the educational psychologist or school will arrange.

An educational psychologist may decide that they need to undertake or support school in group work involving your child.  Parents/carers will always be kept fully informed of any such decisions.

The educational psychologist or advisory teacher may decide that the situation needs support from another part of the Educational Inclusion Service.  They will ensure that support is then sought but only after discussing with parents and others.

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How much does it cost?

The service is provided free of charge by East Riding of Yorkshire Council.

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Who do I contact if I need more information?

Any concerns should initially be discussed with your child's school or early years provider. If you have any queries after discussing with school please contact the educational Inclusion Service at epbst.support@eastriding.gov.uk.

Alternatively you can contact them on (01482) 392254

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Is there any more impartial information for parents available?

Please find, available to download below, some Parent Partnership Service factsheets which contain impartial information for parents.

 

Parent Partnership Service Confidentiality Policy (pdf 71kb opens in a new window)

Parent Partnership Service Impartiality Policy (pdf 81kb opens in a new window)

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Can I get free school transport for my child with additional needs?

You can find out about the authority's policy on free travel for children with additional needs from the home to school transport page.


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